Free Newsletters - Space - Defense - Environment - Energy - Solar - Nuclear
..
. Nano Technology News .




NANO TECH
NIST shows ultrasonically propelled nanorods spin dizzyingly fast
by Staff Writers
Washington DC (SPX) Jul 23, 2014


In this image, a nanoparticle traces the microvortical flow around a nanorod rotating at up to 150,000 RPM propelled by ultrasound. Image courtesy Balk and NIST.

Vibrate a solution of rod-shaped metal nanoparticles in water with ultrasound and they'll spin around their long axes like tiny drill bits. Why? No one yet knows exactly. But researchers at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) have clocked their speed-and it's fast. At up to 150,000 revolutions per minute, these nanomotors rotate 10 times faster than any nanoscale object submerged in liquid ever reported.

The discovery of this dizzying rate has opened up the possibility that they could be used not only for moving around inside the body-the impetus for the research-but also for high-speed machining and mixing.

Scientists have been studying how to make nanomotors move around in liquids for the past several years. A group at Penn State looking for a biologically friendly way to propel nanomotors first observed that metal nanorods were moving and rotating in response to ultrasound in 2012.

Another group at the University of California San Diego then directed the metal rods' forward motion using a magnetic field. The Penn State group then demonstrated that these nanomotors could be propelled inside of a cancer cell.

But no one knew why or how fast the nanomotors were spinning. The latter being a measurement problem, researchers at NIST worked with the Penn State group to solve it.

"If nanomotors are to be used in a biological environment, then it is important to understand how they interact with the liquid and objects around them," says NIST project leader Samuel Stavis. "We used nanoparticles to trace the flow of water around the nanomotors, and we used that measurement to infer their rate of rotation. We found that the nanomotors were spinning surprisingly rapidly."

The NIST team clocked the nanomotors' rotation by mixing the 2-micrometer-long, 300-nanometer-wide gold rods with 400-nanometer-diameter polystyrene beads in water and putting them between glass and silicon plates with a speaker-type shaker beneath. They then vibrated the shaker at an ultrasonic tone of 3 megahertz-much too high for you or your dog to hear-and watched the motors and beads move.

As the motors rotate in water, they create a vortex around them. Beads that get close get swept up by the vortex and swirl around the rods. By measuring how far the beads are from the rods and how fast they move, the group was able to work out how quickly the motors were spinning-with an important caveat.

"The size of the nanorods is important in our measurements" says NIST physicist Andrew Balk. "We found that even small variations in the rod's dimensions cause large measurement uncertainties, so they need to be fabricated as uniformly as possible for future studies and applications."

According to the researchers, the speed of the nanomotors' rotation seems to be independent of their forward motion. Being able to control the "speed and feed" of the nanomotors independently would open up the possibility that they could be used as rotary tools for machining and mixing.

Future avenues of research include trying to discover exactly why the motors rotate and how the vortex around the rods affects their interactions with each other.

A.L. Balk, L.O. Mair, P.P. Mathai, P.N. Patrone, W.Wang, S. Ahmed, T.E. Mallouk, J.A. Liddle and S.M. Stavis. Kilohertz rotation of nanorods propelled by ultrasound, traced by microvortex advection of nanoparticles. ACS Nano

.


Related Links
National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST)
Nano Technology News From SpaceMart.com
Computer Chip Architecture, Technology and Manufacture






Comment on this article via your Facebook, Yahoo, AOL, Hotmail login.

Share this article via these popular social media networks
del.icio.usdel.icio.us DiggDigg RedditReddit GoogleGoogle




Memory Foam Mattress Review
Newsletters :: SpaceDaily :: SpaceWar :: TerraDaily :: Energy Daily
XML Feeds :: Space News :: Earth News :: War News :: Solar Energy News





NANO TECH
"Nanocamera" takes pictures at distances smaller than light's own wavelength
Champaign IL (SPX) Jul 22, 2014
Researchers at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign have demonstrated that an array of novel gold, pillar-bowtie nanoantennas (pBNAs) can be used like traditional photographic film to record light for distances that are much smaller than the wavelength of light (for example, distances less than ~600 nm for red light). A standard optical microscope acts as a "nanocamera" whereas the pBN ... read more


NANO TECH
Typhoon fighter program a boon for British companies

France receives upgraded AWACS plane

Sweden not a bidder for fighter procurement by Denmark

Brazilian Air Force jet engines receiving Avio Aero support

NANO TECH
Lunar rock collisions behind Yutu damage

China to launch HD observation satellite this year

China's Fast Track To Circumlunar Mission

Chinese moon rover designer shooting for Mars

NANO TECH
IT security company issues heads-up to small enterprises

Apple denies Chinese report of location tracking security risk

Putin condemns 'hypocrisy' of Western cyber-espionage

Industrial control a weak link in cybersecurity: study

NANO TECH
EU sets new energy savings target at 30%

U.S. ranks 13th among 16 economies in energy efficiency

Germany most energy efficient nation: study

Minnesota Power to fund renewables in EPA settlement

NANO TECH
Improving the cost and efficiency of renewable energy storage

Organic zeolites

Rutgers Chemists Develop Clean-Burning Hydrogen Fuel

3-D nanostructure could benefit gas storage

NANO TECH
Army developing pocket-sized ISR system for soldiers

New collaboration between Australian military, universities

Dynamics Aviation continues CEASAR program support

Enertec Systems 2001 Ltd receives new Israeli order

NANO TECH
"Nanocamera" takes pictures at distances smaller than light's own wavelength

Rice nanophotonics experts create powerful molecular sensor

Researchers demonstrate novel, tunable nanoantennas

Illinois study advances limits for ultrafast nano-devices

NANO TECH
This time for the PLA: Chinese army shows off dancing robots

Wake up, robot

Astronauts to Test Free-Flying "Housekeeper" Robots

Medical advances turn science fiction into science fact




The content herein, unless otherwise known to be public domain, are Copyright 1995-2014 - Space Media Network. All websites are published in Australia and are solely subject to Australian law and governed by Fair Use principals for news reporting and research purposes. AFP, UPI and IANS news wire stories are copyright Agence France-Presse, United Press International and Indo-Asia News Service. ESA news reports are copyright European Space Agency. All NASA sourced material is public domain. Additional copyrights may apply in whole or part to other bona fide parties. Advertising does not imply endorsement, agreement or approval of any opinions, statements or information provided by Space Media Network on any Web page published or hosted by Space Media Network. Privacy Statement All images and articles appearing on Space Media Network have been edited or digitally altered in some way. Any requests to remove copyright material will be acted upon in a timely and appropriate manner. Any attempt to extort money from Space Media Network will be ignored and reported to Australian Law Enforcement Agencies as a potential case of financial fraud involving the use of a telephonic carriage device or postal service.