Subscribe free to our newsletters via your
  Nano Technology News  


Subscribe free to our newsletters via your




















NANO TECH
Nanomotors could help electronics fix themselves
by Staff Writers
San Diego CA (SPX) Mar 22, 2016


Gold circuits and other electronic components could one day be healed by self-propelled nanomotors. Image courtesy Wang lab (UCSD). For a larger version of this image please go here.

As electronics grow ever more intricate, so must the tools required to fix them. Anticipating this challenge, scientists turned to the body's immune system for inspiration and have now built self-propelled nanomotors that can seek out and repair tiny scratches to electronic systems. They could one day lead to flexible batteries, electrodes, solar cells and other gadgets that heal themselves.

The researchers present their work at the 251st National Meeting and Exposition of the American Chemical Society (ACS). ACS, the world's largest scientific society, is holding the meeting here through Thursday. It features more than 12,500 presentations on a wide range of science topics.

"Electronic circuits are very sophisticated these days," says Jinxing Li. "But a crack, even an extremely small one, can interrupt the flow of current and eventually lead to the failure of a device. Traditional electronics can be fixed with soldering, but repairing advanced electronics on a nanoscale requires innovation."

Gadgets will soon be more ubiquitous than ever, appearing in our clothes, implants and accessories, says Li, a Ph.D. candidate in the lab of Joseph Wang, D.Sc., at the University of California at San Diego. But finding ways to fix nanocircuits, battery electrodes or other electronic components when they break remains a challenge.

Replacing whole devices or even parts can be tricky or expensive, particularly if they're integrated in clothes or located in remote places. Creating devices that can fix themselves would be ideal, according to Wang, whose lab develops nanoscale machines. To work toward this goal, his lab and others have turned to nature for ideas.

"If you cut your finger, for example, platelets will automatically localize at the wound location and help start the healing process," Li says. "So what we wanted to do is create and use extremely small robots to perform the same function, except in an electronic system."

To accomplish this, Wang's team collaborated with the group of Anna Balazs, Ph.D., who is at the University of Pittsburgh. They designed and built nanoparticles out of gold and platinum that are powered by hydrogen peroxide.

The platinum spurs the fuel to break down into water and oxygen, which propels the particles. Testing showed that the nanomotors zoomed over the surface of a broken electronic circuit connected to a light-emitting diode, or LED. When they approached the scratch, they got lodged in it and bridged the gap between the two sides. Because the particles are made of conductive metals, they allowed current to flow again, and the LED lit up.

Li says the nanomotors would be ideal for hard-to-repair electronic components such as the conductive layer of solar cells, which are subject to harsh environmental conditions and prone to scratching. They could also be used to heal flexible sensors and batteries, which the Wang lab is also developing.

Additionally, the same concept with different materials and fuels could be used in medical applications for delivering drugs to specific locations. The lab is also developing new nanomotors that could potentially be deployed in the body to treat different diseases, such as stomach infections.

.


Related Links
American Chemical Society
Nano Technology News From SpaceMart.com
Computer Chip Architecture, Technology and Manufacture






Comment on this article via your Facebook, Yahoo, AOL, Hotmail login.

Share this article via these popular social media networks
del.icio.usdel.icio.us DiggDigg RedditReddit GoogleGoogle

Previous Report
NANO TECH
Atomic vibrations in nanomaterials
Zurich, Switzerland (SPX) Mar 17, 2016
All materials are made up of atoms, which vibrate. These vibrations, or 'phonons', are responsible, for example, for how electric charge and heat is transported in materials. Vibrations of metals, semiconductors, and insulators in are well studied; however, now materials are being nanosized to bring better performance to applications such as displays, sensors, batteries, and catalytic membranes. ... read more


NANO TECH
Canadian Coast Guard receives final Bell 429 helicopter

Space keeps us safe as air travel rises

Lockheed Martin delivers KC-130J refuelers to Saudi Arabia

Second CH-53K helicopter enters testing program

NANO TECH
China's ambition after space station

Sky is the limit for China's national strategy

Aim Higher: China Plans to Send Rover to Mars in 2020

China's lunar probe sets record for longest stay

NANO TECH
Google spotlights rise in web traffic encryption

Apple says FBI out to 'rewrite history' in iPhone case

N. Korea slams Seoul's cyber attack accusations

US argues for 'modest' Apple help in attacks probe

NANO TECH
Transforming the US transportation system by 2050 to address climate challenges

Economic growth no longer translates into more greenhouse gas: IEA

Long march in Bangladesh against Sundarbans power plant

China emissions goals less ambitious than 2015 cuts: plan

NANO TECH
Hot rocks: Kenya taps geothermal heat to boost power

MIT develops nontoxic way of generating portable power

Ferrite boosting photocatalytic hydrogen evolution

New fuel cell design powered by graphene-wrapped nanocrystals

NANO TECH
Northrop to develop new IMU guidance system for weapons

DynCorp wins U.S. intelligence support contract

Ford offers police greater ballistic protection for vehicles

Factory for Ajax armored vehicles inaugurated

NANO TECH
ASRC professor leads study on reconfigurable magnetic nanopatterns

Atomic vibrations in nanomaterials

NIST invents fleet and fast test for nanomanufacturing quality control

Building a better mouse trap, from the atoms up

NANO TECH
Drexel research helps bacteria-powered microrobots plot a course

Robot learning companion offers custom-tailored tutoring

Light illuminates the way for bio-bots

Domino's to trial robots for pizza delivery




Memory Foam Mattress Review
Newsletters :: SpaceDaily :: SpaceWar :: TerraDaily :: Energy Daily
XML Feeds :: Space News :: Earth News :: War News :: Solar Energy News








The content herein, unless otherwise known to be public domain, are Copyright 1995-2016 - Space Media Network. All websites are published in Australia and are solely subject to Australian law and governed by Fair Use principals for news reporting and research purposes. AFP, UPI and IANS news wire stories are copyright Agence France-Presse, United Press International and Indo-Asia News Service. ESA news reports are copyright European Space Agency. All NASA sourced material is public domain. Additional copyrights may apply in whole or part to other bona fide parties. Advertising does not imply endorsement, agreement or approval of any opinions, statements or information provided by Space Media Network on any Web page published or hosted by Space Media Network. Privacy Statement All images and articles appearing on Space Media Network have been edited or digitally altered in some way. Any requests to remove copyright material will be acted upon in a timely and appropriate manner. Any attempt to extort money from Space Media Network will be ignored and reported to Australian Law Enforcement Agencies as a potential case of financial fraud involving the use of a telephonic carriage device or postal service.