Subscribe to our free daily newsletters
  Nano Technology News  




Subscribe to our free daily newsletters



NANO TECH
Nanosized silicon heater and thermometer combined to fight cancer
by Staff Writers
Saint Petersburg, Russia (SPX) Jun 05, 2017


This is comparing golden and silicon nanoparticles: temperature dependence of optical response. Credit ITMO University

Russian physicists from ITMO University have found out that spherical silicon nanoparticles can be effectively heated up, and simultaneously emit light depending on their temperature. According to the scientists, these properties coupled with a good biocompatibility will allow usage of the semiconductor nanoparticles in photothermal therapy and nanosurgery.

The researchers plan to control the heating of the silicon particles in the future to internally burn cancer cells without affecting healthy tissue. The results appeared in the prestigious journal Nano Letters.

When carrying out photothermal therapy and nanosurgery, doctors inject nanoparticles of biocompatible metals, such as gold, into a human body, concentrate them on a tumour and irradiate them with a laser. Biological tissues are transparent for infrared light, but metal nanoparticles absorb it well and convert it into heat that burns cancer cells.

However, measuring a local temperature of gold nanoparticles is an extremely difficult task that, if not properly done, could lead to overheating and damage of healthy tissue. Scientists continue searching for biocompatible substances able to heat up and simultaneously inform about their temperature.

Physicists from ITMO University have found such a material in silicon. As the new study shows, resonant silicon nanoparticles are heated up even faster than golden ones due to the better resonant properties and, in contrast, can signal about their temperature by scattering light with different wavelength. Such scattering effect is known in optics as Raman scattering. Moreover, this optical response can be registered without complex devices or vacuum systems that are required to capture signals from metals.

"Golden nanoparticles are widely used in photothermal therapy, photochemistry and nanosurgery. But the optical response of such agents does not give information about how much they are heated, because metals never re-emit Raman light signal. At the same time, it was known that silicon has an optical response that strongly changes with temperature. But no one imagined that a silicon nanoparticle can be used as an efficient heater, since it has significantly less optical losses than gold," says George Zograf, graduate student of Department of Nano-Photonics and Metamaterials at ITMO University.

Knowing that the optical response of silicon strongly depends on temperature and this material is biocompatible, the researchers tested how effectively the nanoparticles are heated up and how accurately one can register their temperature. The researchers raised the temperature of silicon nanoparticles illuminating them with laser and recorded the emitted Raman signal, which allowed simultaneous temperature detection.

Meanwhile, in contrast to the golden nanospheres, the tested silicon particles were four times more efficient in converting laser radiation into heat. This would allow changing the nanoparticles' temperature using a less powerful laser beam without heating nearby healthy tissue.

The researchers believe that the semiconductor nanoparticles can be a cheaper and safer alternative to metal. "In the future, one will be able to kill cancer cells with high precision by heating them with the help of such nanosystems. The real-time optical control of their temperature will prevent healthy cells from uncontrolled overheating," concludes Sergey Makarov, senior researcher of Department of Nanophotonics and Metamaterials at ITMO University.

Resonant non-plasmonic nanoparticles for efficient temperature-feedback optical heating (2017), George P. Zograf, Mihail I. Petrov, Dmitry A. Zuev, Pavel A. Dmitriev, Valentin A. Milichko, Sergey V. Makarov, and Pavel A. Belov, Nano Letters

NANO TECH
Ultrafast nanophotonics: Turmoil in sluggish electrons' existence
Munich, Germany (SPX) May 30, 2017
An international team of physicists has monitored the scattering behavior of electrons in a non-conducting material in real-time. Their insights could be beneficial for radiotherapy. We can refer to electrons in non-conducting materials as 'sluggish'. Typically, they remain fixed in a location, deep inside an atomic composite. It is hence relatively still in a dielectric crystal lattice. T ... read more

Related Links
ITMO University
Nano Technology News From SpaceMart.com
Computer Chip Architecture, Technology and Manufacture

Thanks for being here;
We need your help. The SpaceDaily news network continues to grow but revenues have never been harder to maintain.

With the rise of Ad Blockers, and Facebook - our traditional revenue sources via quality network advertising continues to decline. And unlike so many other news sites, we don't have a paywall - with those annoying usernames and passwords.

Our news coverage takes time and effort to publish 365 days a year.

If you find our news sites informative and useful then please consider becoming a regular supporter or for now make a one off contribution.

SpaceDaily Contributor
$5 Billed Once


credit card or paypal
SpaceDaily Monthly Supporter
$5 Billed Monthly


paypal only

Comment using your Disqus, Facebook, Google or Twitter login.

Share this article via these popular social media networks
del.icio.usdel.icio.us DiggDigg RedditReddit GoogleGoogle

NANO TECH
Cube Quest Challenge Team Spotlight: Cislunar Explorers

Winning plans for CubeSats to the Moon

Printing bricks from moondust using the Sun's heat

NASA selects ASU's ShadowCam for moon mission

NANO TECH
California Woman Charged for Trying to Hand Over Sensitive Space Tech to China

A cabin on the moon? China hones the lunar lifestyle

China tests 'Lunar Palace' as it eyes moon mission

China to conduct several manned space flights around 2020

NANO TECH
Random numbers: Hard times ahead for hackers

China to launch cybersecurity law despite concerns

Russia's disinformation efforts hit 39 countries: researchers

Jury out on North Korea link to ransomware attack

NANO TECH
Cube Quest Challenge Team Spotlight: Cislunar Explorers

Winning plans for CubeSats to the Moon

Printing bricks from moondust using the Sun's heat

NASA selects ASU's ShadowCam for moon mission

NANO TECH
Nanosized silicon heater and thermometer combined to fight cancer

Ultrafast nanophotonics: Turmoil in sluggish electrons' existence

Stanford scientists use nanotechnology to boost the performance of key industrial catalyst

Researchers create first significant examples of optical crystallography for nanomaterials

NANO TECH
The heat is on for Sentinel-3B

exactEarth Launches Revolutionary Global Real-Time Maritime Tracking and Information Service

Earth is a jewel, says astronaut after six months away

SES-14 integrates NASA ultraviolet space spectrograph

NANO TECH
Nanosized silicon heater and thermometer combined to fight cancer

Ultrafast nanophotonics: Turmoil in sluggish electrons' existence

Stanford scientists use nanotechnology to boost the performance of key industrial catalyst

Researchers create first significant examples of optical crystallography for nanomaterials

NANO TECH
Muscle grafts could help amputees sense and control artificial limbs

Tactile sensor gives robots new capabilities

Meet the most nimble-fingered robot ever built

Apple 'HomePod' speaker to take on Amazon, Google




Memory Foam Mattress Review
Newsletters :: SpaceDaily :: SpaceWar :: TerraDaily :: Energy Daily
XML Feeds :: Space News :: Earth News :: War News :: Solar Energy News






The content herein, unless otherwise known to be public domain, are Copyright 1995-2017 - Space Media Network. All websites are published in Australia and are solely subject to Australian law and governed by Fair Use principals for news reporting and research purposes. AFP, UPI and IANS news wire stories are copyright Agence France-Presse, United Press International and Indo-Asia News Service. ESA news reports are copyright European Space Agency. All NASA sourced material is public domain. Additional copyrights may apply in whole or part to other bona fide parties. All articles labeled "by Staff Writers" include reports supplied to Space Media Network by industry news wires, PR agencies, corporate press officers and the like. Such articles are individually curated and edited by Space Media Network staff on the basis of the report's information value to our industry and professional readership. Advertising does not imply endorsement, agreement or approval of any opinions, statements or information provided by Space Media Network on any Web page published or hosted by Space Media Network. Privacy Statement