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NANO TECH
Nanotubes that build themselves
by Staff Writers
Lund, Sweden (SPX) Apr 20, 2017


File image.

Researchers from Lund University in Sweden have succeeded in producing nanotubes from a single building block using so-called molecular self-recognition. The tube can also change shape depending on the surrounding environment. The results can contribute to the future development of transport channels for drugs through the cell membrane.

In the present study, researchers from Lund University in Sweden, together with colleagues from Vilnius University in Lithuania, have studied how molecules attach to each other using weak chemical bonds to form large structures.

The aim of the study was to determine the smallest possible size of these molecules, in which they are still able to provide enough information to successfully attach and form a desired large structure. The researchers' strategy has been to use many weak hydrogen bonds which assemble themselves in a pre-programmed manner.

"It took 20 years for us to discover the design of this molecule which resulted in molecular nanotubes", says Kenneth Warnmark, chemistry professor at the Faculty of Science at Lund University.

As a unique bonus, they also discovered that the molecule can construct different shapes, depending on its environment. The researchers are able to modify this environment, partly, through their choice of solvent and, partly, through their choice of a so-called "guest molecule".

"The molecules can form a tube, but also change into the shape of a capsule or a molecular belt", Kenneth Warnmark.

Unlike the developed carbon nanotubes which are already on the market, the new molecular nanotubes can be regulated with regard to the diameter. Furthermore, the manufacturing process is both simpler and more environmentally friendly compared to that of the carbon nanotubes which are made from individual carbon atoms and are assembled using strong chemical bonds at high temperature.

"Being able to regulate the diameter is importance if you, for instance, want to use the tubes to transport something inside", says Kenneth Warnmark.

One possible application is the transport of drugs through a cell membrane for which the molecular nanotube can serve as a channel. The diameter of the tube and the properties of its surface make it suitable for transporting substances that regulate nerve signals in the human body, such as acetylcholine.

"People with Alzheimer's disease suffer from acetylcholine deficiency and hopefully, in the future, this could be a way to reduce the impact of the disease. However, it requires a lot more research as well as clinical studies before we know whether or not it works", says Kenneth Warnmark.

NANO TECH
Scientists created nanopowders for the synthesis of new aluminum alloys
Krasnoyarsk, Russia (SPX) Apr 10, 2017
The project received support from the Regional Science Foundation and the Russian Foundation for Basic Research in the competition for oriented interdisciplinary research in 2016. The results of the research were published in the journals "Physics of the Solid State", "Vacuum" and "Journal of Superconductivity and Novel Magnetism". The authors of the project say that with the help of this ... read more

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