Subscribe to our free daily newsletters
  Nano Technology News  




Subscribe to our free daily newsletters



NANO TECH
New research explores the limits of nanomaterials and atomic effects for nanotechnology
by Staff Writers
Swansea UK (SPX) Oct 26, 2017


One-of-a-kind multi-probe LT Nanoprobe at Swansea University used to obtain the electrical measurements of nanowires that were correlated to atomic resolution imaging.

Research by scientists at Swansea University has shown that improvements in nanowire structures will allow for the manufacture of more stable and durable nanotechnology for use in semiconductor devices in the future.

Dr Alex Lord and Professor Steve Wilks from the Centre for NanoHealth led the collaborative research published in Nano Letters. The research team defined the limits of electrical contact technology to nanowires at atomic scales with world-leading instrumentation and global collaborations that can be used to develop enhanced devices based on the nanomaterials. Well-defined, stable and predictable electrical contacts are essential for any electrical circuit and electronic device because they control the flow of electricity that is fundamental to the operational capability.

Their experiments found for the first time, that atomic changes to the metal catalyst particle edge can entirely alter electrical conduction and most importantly reveal physical evidence of the effects of a long standing problem for electrical contacts known as barrier inhomogeneity. The study revealed the electrical and physical limits of the materials that will allow nanoengineers to select the properties of manufacturable nanowire devices.

Dr Lord, recently appointed as a Senior Ser Cymru II Fellow part-funded by the European Regional Development Fund through the Welsh Government, said: "The experiments had a simple premise but were challenging to optimise and allow atomic-scale imaging of the interfaces. However, it was essential to this study and will allow many more materials to be investigated in a similar way.

"This research now gives us an understanding of these new effects and will allow engineers in the future to reliably produce electrical contacts to these nanomaterials which is essential for the materials to be used in the technologies of tomorrow.

"The new concepts shown here provide interesting possibilities for bridged nanowire devices such as transient electronics and reactive circuit breakers that respond to changes in electrical signals or environmental factors and provide instantaneous reactions to electrical overload."

The Swansea research team used specialist experimental equipment at the Centre for NanoHealth and collaborated with Professor Quentin Ramasse of the SuperSTEM Laboratory, Science and Facilities Technology Council1-3 and Dr Frances Ross of the IBM Thomas J. Watson Research Center, USA.3 The scientists were able to physically interact with the nanostructures and measure how atomic changes in the materials affected the electrical performance.

Dr. Frances Ross, IBM, USA, added: "This research shows the importance of global collaboration, particularly in allowing unique instrumentation to be used to obtain fundamental results that allow nanoscience to deliver the next generation of technologies."

Nanotechnology is the scaling down of everyday materials by scientists to the size of nanometres (one million times smaller than a millimetre on a standard ruler) and is seen as the future of electronic devices. Progressions in scientific and engineering advances are resulting in new technologies such as computer components for smart devices and sensors to monitor our health and the surrounding environment.

Nanotechnology is having a major influence on the Internet of Things which connects everything from our homes to our cars into a web of communication. All of these new technologies require similar advances in electrical circuits and especially electrical contacts that allow the devices to work correctly with electricity.

Research paper

NANO TECH
Jumping nanoparticles
Vienna, Austria (SPX) Oct 26, 2017
In 1827, the English botanist Robert Brown made an observation of seemingly little importance that would turn out to play a central role in the development of the atomic theory of matter. Looking through the objective of a microscope, he noticed that pollen grains floating in water were constantly jiggling around as if driven by an invisible force, a phenomenon now known as Brownian motion ... read more

Related Links
Swansea University
Nano Technology News From SpaceMart.com
Computer Chip Architecture, Technology and Manufacture


Thanks for being here;
We need your help. The SpaceDaily news network continues to grow but revenues have never been harder to maintain.

With the rise of Ad Blockers, and Facebook - our traditional revenue sources via quality network advertising continues to decline. And unlike so many other news sites, we don't have a paywall - with those annoying usernames and passwords.

Our news coverage takes time and effort to publish 365 days a year.

If you find our news sites informative and useful then please consider becoming a regular supporter or for now make a one off contribution.

SpaceDaily Contributor
$5 Billed Once


credit card or paypal
SpaceDaily Monthly Supporter
$5 Billed Monthly


paypal only

Comment using your Disqus, Facebook, Google or Twitter login.

Share this article via these popular social media networks
del.icio.usdel.icio.us DiggDigg RedditReddit GoogleGoogle

NANO TECH
Human presence in Lunar orbit one step closer with successful RS-25 engine test

NASA research suggests significant atmosphere in lunar past and possible source of water on Moon

Lunar lava tube could be used as a moon mission base

Potential human habitat located on Moon

NANO TECH
Space will see Communist loyalty: Chinese astronaut

China launches three satellites

Mars probe to carry 13 types of payload on 2020 mission

UN official commends China's role in space cooperation

NANO TECH
MP asks Facebook about Russian-linked ads in Brexit vote

Is facial recognition the stuff of sci-fi? Not in China

NATO states open counter-espionage hub in Poland

Chinese social media block profile pic changes during congress

NANO TECH
Human presence in Lunar orbit one step closer with successful RS-25 engine test

NASA research suggests significant atmosphere in lunar past and possible source of water on Moon

Lunar lava tube could be used as a moon mission base

Potential human habitat located on Moon

NANO TECH
Terahertz spectroscopy goes nano

Nanotube fiber antennas as capable as copper

New technique produces tunable, nanoporous materials

Jumping nanoparticles

NANO TECH
First joint France-China satellite to study oceans

Satellites map photosynthesis at high resolution

Sentinel-5P: satellite in excellent health

Study casts doubt on warming implications of brown carbon aerosol from wildfires

NANO TECH
Terahertz spectroscopy goes nano

Nanotube fiber antennas as capable as copper

New technique produces tunable, nanoporous materials

Jumping nanoparticles

NANO TECH
Liquid metal brings soft robotics a step closer

Intel working with Facebook on chips for AI

Robot wars: US smashes Japan in giant days-long duel

Samsung's revamped Bixby takes on Amazon Alexa




Memory Foam Mattress Review
Newsletters :: SpaceDaily :: SpaceWar :: TerraDaily :: Energy Daily
XML Feeds :: Space News :: Earth News :: War News :: Solar Energy News






The content herein, unless otherwise known to be public domain, are Copyright 1995-2017 - Space Media Network. All websites are published in Australia and are solely subject to Australian law and governed by Fair Use principals for news reporting and research purposes. AFP, UPI and IANS news wire stories are copyright Agence France-Presse, United Press International and Indo-Asia News Service. ESA news reports are copyright European Space Agency. All NASA sourced material is public domain. Additional copyrights may apply in whole or part to other bona fide parties. All articles labeled "by Staff Writers" include reports supplied to Space Media Network by industry news wires, PR agencies, corporate press officers and the like. Such articles are individually curated and edited by Space Media Network staff on the basis of the report's information value to our industry and professional readership. Advertising does not imply endorsement, agreement or approval of any opinions, statements or information provided by Space Media Network on any Web page published or hosted by Space Media Network. Privacy Statement