. Nano Technology News .

Quantum computers counting on carbon nanotubes
by Staff Writers
Garching, Germany (SPX) Mar 25, 2013

Like a guitar string nanotubes (black) can be clamped and excited to vibrate. An electric field (electrodes: blue) ensures that two of the many possible states can be selectively addressed. Image: M.J. Hartmann, TUM.

Carbon nanotubes can be used as quantum bits for quantum computers. A study by physicists at the Technische Universitaet Muenchen (TUM) has shown how nanotubes can store information in the form of vibrations. Up to now, researchers have experimented primarily with electrically charged particles.

Because nanomechanical devices are not charged, they are much less sensitive to electrical interference.

Using quantum mechanical phenomena, computers could be much more powerful than their classical digital predecessors. Scientists all over the world are working to explore the basis for quantum computing. To date most systems are based on electrically charged particles that are held in an "electromagnetic trap."

A disadvantage of these systems is that they are very sensitive to electromagnetic interference and therefore need extensive shielding. Physicists at the Technische Universitaet Muenchen have now found a way for information to be stored and quantum mechanically processed in mechanical vibrations.

Playing a nano-guitar
A carbon nanotube that is clamped at both ends can be excited to oscillate. Like a guitar string, it vibrates for an amazingly long time. "One would expect that such a system would be strongly damped, and that the vibration would subside quickly," says Simon Rips, first author of the publication.

"In fact, the string vibrates more than a million times. The information is thus retained up to one second. That is long enough to work with."

Since such a string oscillates among many physically equivalent states, the physicists resorted to a trick: an electric field in the vicinity of the nanotube ensures that two of these states can be selectively addressed. The information can then be written and read optoelectronically.

"Our concept is based on available technology," says Michael Hartmann, head of the Emmy Noether research group Quantum Optics and Quantum Dynamics at the TU Muenchen. "It could take us a step closer to the realization of a quantum computer."

The research was supported by the German Research Council (DFG) within the Emmy-Noether program and SFB 631. Quantum Information Processing with Nanomechanical Qubits; Simon Rips and Michael J. Hartmann, Physical Review Letters, 110, 1205034 (2013) DOI: 10.1103/PhysRevLett.110.120503


Related Links
Technische Universitaet Muenchen
Nano Technology News From SpaceMart.com
Computer Chip Architecture, Technology and Manufacture

Comment on this article via your Facebook, Yahoo, AOL, Hotmail login.

Share this article via these popular social media networks
del.icio.usdel.icio.us DiggDigg RedditReddit GoogleGoogle

Memory Foam Mattress Review

Newsletters :: SpaceDaily Express :: SpaceWar Express :: TerraDaily Express :: Energy Daily
XML Feeds :: Space News :: Earth News :: War News :: Solar Energy News

Get Our Free Newsletters
Space - Defense - Environment - Energy - Solar - Nuclear


Researchers create nanoscale spinning magnetic droplets
Raleigh NC (SPX) Mar 20, 2013
Researchers have successfully created a magnetic soliton - a nano-sized, spinning droplet that was first theorized 35 years ago. These solitons have implications for the creation of magnetic, spin-based computers. Solitons are waves, localized in space, that preserve their size and momentum. They were first observed in water. Solitons composed of light have proved useful for long distance, ... read more

Listening for the Boom and Rattle of Supersonic Flight

Navy tasks Virginia Tech research team with reducing deafening roar of fighter jets

Peru mulls replacing aged air force jets

France says Malaysia can build jets if it buys Rafale

China's Next Women Astronauts

Shenzhou 10 - Next Stop: Jiuquan

China's fourth space launch center to be in use in two years

China to launch new manned spacecraft

Papers link top China university to army 'hacking' unit

Vietnam War whistleblower defends WikiLeaks 'hero'

Taiwan sets up Internet shield to tackle China 'hacking'

S. Korea tracks cyber attack to China, North still suspect

Chinese leader Xi, Putin agree key energy deals

India is fourth largest energy consumer

'Earth Hour' evolves into springboard for wider action

The household carbon emission per capita in Northwestern China is only 2.05 tons CO2 per year

NRL Nike Laser Focuses on Nuclear Fusion

Greenhouse gas emissions of cars could drop 80 percent by 2050

Signalhorn Expands in Oman for Oil and Gas Customer

Trojan Battery Introduces Single-Point Watering System For Its Flooded Batteries

Nanofoams could create better body armor

NGC Offers New High-Resolution Sensors for Hawk Air Defense System

Seven killed in Marine Corps training accident

UN staring down a barrel over arms treaty

Smallest Vibration Sensor in the Quantum World

Researchers create nanoscale spinning magnetic droplets

New technique could improve optical devices

Silver nanoparticles may adversely affect environment

Robots joining China businesses, factories

Technique could help designers predict how legged robots will move on granular surfaces

Digital 'talking head' speaks for computer

Google buys machine learning startup

The content herein, unless otherwise known to be public domain, are Copyright 1995-2012 - Space Media Network. AFP, UPI and IANS news wire stories are copyright Agence France-Presse, United Press International and Indo-Asia News Service. ESA Portal Reports are copyright European Space Agency. All NASA sourced material is public domain. Additional copyrights may apply in whole or part to other bona fide parties. Advertising does not imply endorsement,agreement or approval of any opinions, statements or information provided by Space Media Network on any Web page published or hosted by Space Media Network. Privacy Statement