Subscribe free to our newsletters via your
  Nano Technology News  

Subscribe free to our newsletters via your

Stretchable nano-devices towards smart contact lenses
by Staff Writers
Melbourne, Australia (SPX) Feb 23, 2016

These are nanoscale glass structures that filter or manipulate light. Image courtesy RMIT and The University of Adelaide. For a larger version of this image please go here.

Researchers at RMIT University and the University of Adelaide have joined forces to create a stretchable nano-scale device to manipulate light. The device manipulates light to such an extent that it can filter specific colours while still being transparent and could be used in the future to make smart contact lenses.

Using the technology, high-tech lenses could one day filter harmful optical radiation without interfering with vision - or in a more advanced version, transmit data and gather live vital information or even show information like a head-up display.

The light manipulation relies on creating tiny artificial crystals termed "dielectric resonators", which are a fraction of the wavelength of light - 100-200 nanometers, or over 500 times thinner than a human hair.

The research combined the University of Adelaide researchers' expertise in interaction of light with artificial materials with the materials science and nanofabrication expertise at RMIT University.

Dr Withawat Withayachumnankul, from the University of Adelaide's School of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, said: "Manipulation of light using these artificial crystals uses precise engineering.

"With advanced techniques to control the properties of surfaces, we can dynamically control their filter properties, which allow us to potentially create devices for high data-rate optical communication or smart contact lenses.

"The current challenge is that dielectric resonators only work for specific colours, but with our flexible surface we can adjust the operation range simply by stretching it."

Associate Professor Madhu Bhaskaran, Co-Leader of the Functional Materials and Microsystems Research Group at RMIT, said the devices were made on a rubber-like material used for contact lenses.

"We embed precisely-controlled crystals of titanium oxide, a material that is usually found in sunscreen, in these soft and pliable materials," she said.

"Both materials are proven to be bio-compatible, forming an ideal platform for wearable optical devices.

"By engineering the shape of these common materials, we can create a device that changes properties when stretched. This modifies the way the light interacts with and travels through the device, which holds promise of making smart contact lenses and stretchable colour changing surfaces."

Lead author and RMIT researcher Dr. Philipp Gutruf said the major scientific hurdle overcome by the team was combining high temperature processed titanium dioxide with the rubber-like material, and achieving nanoscale features.

"With this technology, we now have the ability to develop light weight wearable optical components which also allow for the creation of futuristic devices such as smart contact lenses or flexible ultra thin smartphone cameras," Gutruf said.

The work, which has been published in leading micro-/nano-science journal ACS Nano, was undertaken at RMIT's state-of-the-art Micro Nano Research Facility and supported by the Australian Research Council.


Related Links
RMIT University
Nano Technology News From
Computer Chip Architecture, Technology and Manufacture

Comment on this article via your Facebook, Yahoo, AOL, Hotmail login.

Share this article via these popular social media networks DiggDigg RedditReddit GoogleGoogle

Previous Report
New ways to construct contactless magnetic gears
Tancha, Japan (SPX) Feb 18, 2016
The new milk frother you are using to prepare your cappuccino is likely using magnetic gears. Magnetic gears transmit rotary motion like mechanical gears but instead of teeth they use magnetic attraction and repulsion between rotating magnets. Dr Johannes Schoenke, a postdoctoral scholar at the Okinawa Institute of Science and Technology Graduate University (OIST), published in Physical Review A ... read more

US grants Boeing license to study Iran market

Google's Internet balloon 'crashes' in Sri Lanka test flight

IAI producing more F-35 wing sets

F-35s in test deployment

China Conducts Final Tests on Most Powerful Homegrown Rocket

Last Launch for Long March 2F/G

China aims for the Moon with new rockets

China shoots for first landing on far side of the moon

Hollywood hospital pays bitcoin ransom to hackers

FBI-Apple standoff puts encryption on front burner

US planned major cyberattack on Iran, Berlin fest doc claims

Teen arrested in Britain linked to hack of US spy chiefs

US, Canada and Mexico sign clean energy pact

Supreme Court deals blow to Obama climate plan

Online shopping about as "green" as a three dollar bill

Scientists say window to reduce carbon emissions is small

New synthesis method developed at UEF opens up new possibilities for Li-ion batteries

Cogeneration sector supportive of a comprehensive follow-up to the Heating and Cooling Strategy

Explosive Growth Attracts Major Energy Storage Suppliers in Australia

Creation of Jupiter interior, a step towards room temp superconductivity

Court denies Lockheed Martin JLTV injunction request

Israel Aerospace Industries unveils new loitering munitions

NATO allies sign air-to-ground munitions pact

Swedish Army takes delivery of Archer artillery systems

New ways to construct contactless magnetic gears

Scientists take nanoparticle snapshots

Scientists find a new way to make nanowire lasers

Scientists take key step toward custom-made nanoscale chemical factories

Intelligent robots threaten millions of jobs

Robotically driven system could reduce cost of discovering drug and target interactions

Cockroach inspires robot that squeezes through cracks

Chip could bring deep learning to mobile devices

Memory Foam Mattress Review
Newsletters :: SpaceDaily :: SpaceWar :: TerraDaily :: Energy Daily
XML Feeds :: Space News :: Earth News :: War News :: Solar Energy News

The content herein, unless otherwise known to be public domain, are Copyright 1995-2016 - Space Media Network. All websites are published in Australia and are solely subject to Australian law and governed by Fair Use principals for news reporting and research purposes. AFP, UPI and IANS news wire stories are copyright Agence France-Presse, United Press International and Indo-Asia News Service. ESA news reports are copyright European Space Agency. All NASA sourced material is public domain. Additional copyrights may apply in whole or part to other bona fide parties. Advertising does not imply endorsement, agreement or approval of any opinions, statements or information provided by Space Media Network on any Web page published or hosted by Space Media Network. Privacy Statement All images and articles appearing on Space Media Network have been edited or digitally altered in some way. Any requests to remove copyright material will be acted upon in a timely and appropriate manner. Any attempt to extort money from Space Media Network will be ignored and reported to Australian Law Enforcement Agencies as a potential case of financial fraud involving the use of a telephonic carriage device or postal service.