Subscribe to our free daily newsletters
  Nano Technology News  




Subscribe to our free daily newsletters



NANO TECH
Paper-based supercapacitor uses metal nanoparticles to boost energy density
by Staff Writers
Atlanta GA (SPX) Oct 09, 2017


Images show the difference between paper prior to metallization (left) and the paper coated with conductive nanoparticles.

Using a simple layer-by-layer coating technique, researchers from the U.S. and Korea have developed a paper-based flexible supercapacitor that could be used to help power wearable devices. The device uses metallic nanoparticles to coat cellulose fibers in the paper, creating supercapacitor electrodes with high energy and power densities - and the best performance so far in a textile-based supercapacitor.

By implanting conductive and charge storage materials in the paper, the technique creates large surface areas that function as current collectors and nanoparticle reservoirs for the electrodes. Testing shows that devices fabricated with the technique can be folded thousands of times without affecting conductivity.

"This type of flexible energy storage device could provide unique opportunities for connectivity among wearable and internet of things devices," said Seung Woo Lee, an assistant professor in the Woodruff School of Mechanical Engineering at the Georgia Institute of Technology. "We could support an evolution of the most advanced portable electronics. We also have an opportunity to combine this supercapacitor with energy-harvesting devices that could power biomedical sensors, consumer and military electronics, and similar applications."

The research, done with collaborators at Korea University, was supported by the National Research Foundation of Korea and reported September 14 in the journal Nature Communications.

Energy storage devices are generally judged on three properties: their energy density, power density and cycling stability. Supercapacitors often have high power density, but low energy density - the amount of energy that can be stored - compared to batteries, which often have the opposite attributes. In developing their new technique, Lee and collaborator Jinhan Cho from the Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering at Korea University set out to boost energy density of the supercapacitors while maintaining their high power output.

The researchers began by dipping paper samples into a beaker of solution containing an amine surfactant material designed to bind the gold nanoparticles to the paper. Next they dipped the paper into a solution containing gold nanoparticles. Because the fibers are porous, the surfactants and nanoparticles enter the fibers and become strongly attached, creating a conformal coating on each fiber.

By repeating the dipping steps, the researchers created a conductive paper on which they added alternating layers of metal oxide energy storage materials such as manganese oxide. The ligand-mediated layer-by-layer approach helped minimize the contact resistance between neighboring metal and/or metal oxide nanonparticles. Using the simple process done at room temperatures, the layers can be built up to provide the desired electrical properties.

"It's basically a very simple process," Lee said. "The layer-by-layer process, which we did in alternating beakers, provides a good conformal coating on the cellulose fibers. We can fold the resulting metallized paper and otherwise flex it without damage to the conductivity."

Though the research involved small samples of paper, the solution-based technique could likely be scaled up using larger tanks or even a spray-on technique. "There should be no limitation on the size of the samples that we could produce," Lee said. "We just need to establish the optimal layer thickness that provides good conductivity while minimizing the use of the nanoparticles to optimize the tradeoff between cost and performance."

The researchers demonstrated that their self-assembly technique improves several aspects of the paper supercapacitor, including its areal performance, an important factor for measuring flexible energy-storage electrodes. The maximum power and energy density of the metallic paper-based supercapacitors are estimated to be 15.1mWcm?2 and 267.3 uWh cm?2, respectively, substantially outperforming conventional paper or textile supercapacitors.

The next steps will include testing the technique on flexible fabrics, and developing flexible batteries that could work with the supercapacitors. The researchers used gold nanoparticles because they are easy to work with, but plan to test less expensive metals such as silver and copper to reduce the cost.

During his Ph.D. work, Lee developed the layer-by-layer self-assembly process for energy storage using different materials. With his Korean collaborators, he saw a new opportunity to apply that to flexible and wearable devices with nanoparticles.

"We have nanoscale control over the coating applied to the paper," he added. "If we increase the number of layers, the performance continues to increase. And it's all based on ordinary paper."

Yongmin Ko, Minseong Kwon, Wan Ki Bae, Byeongyong Lee, Seung Woo Lee and Jinhan Cho, "Flexible supercapacitor electrodes based on real metal-like cellulose papers," (Nature Communications, 2017)

NANO TECH
Nanoscale islands dot light-driven catalyst
Houston TX (SPX) Oct 05, 2017
Individual nanoscale nuggets of gold, copper, aluminum, silver and other metals that capture light's energy and put it to work are being employed by Rice University scientists who have discovered a way to build multifunctional nanoscale structures. The structures have an aluminum core and are dotted with even smaller metallic islands. The materials all sustain localized surface plasmon res ... read more

Related Links
Georgia Institute of Technology
Nano Technology News From SpaceMart.com
Computer Chip Architecture, Technology and Manufacture

Thanks for being here;
We need your help. The SpaceDaily news network continues to grow but revenues have never been harder to maintain.

With the rise of Ad Blockers, and Facebook - our traditional revenue sources via quality network advertising continues to decline. And unlike so many other news sites, we don't have a paywall - with those annoying usernames and passwords.

Our news coverage takes time and effort to publish 365 days a year.

If you find our news sites informative and useful then please consider becoming a regular supporter or for now make a one off contribution.

SpaceDaily Contributor
$5 Billed Once


credit card or paypal
SpaceDaily Monthly Supporter
$5 Billed Monthly


paypal only

Comment using your Disqus, Facebook, Google or Twitter login.

Share this article via these popular social media networks
del.icio.usdel.icio.us DiggDigg RedditReddit GoogleGoogle

NANO TECH
Chinese moon missions delayed by rocket failure: report

Moon village the first stop to Mars: ESA

Russian space agency, NASA agree to co-build lunar-orbit space station

NASA, Roscosmos Sign Joint Statement on Researching, Exploring Deep Space

NANO TECH
Mars probe to carry 13 types of payload on 2020 mission

China's cargo spacecraft separates from Tiangong-2 space lab

Work on China's mission to Mars 'well underway'

Chinese company eyes development of reusable launch vehicle

NANO TECH
Ransomware attacks 'global epidemic', says Europol

Twitter reveals Russia-backed ads ahead of US election

China fines tech firms over online content

Chelsea Manning barred from entering Canada

NANO TECH
Chinese moon missions delayed by rocket failure: report

Moon village the first stop to Mars: ESA

Russian space agency, NASA agree to co-build lunar-orbit space station

NASA, Roscosmos Sign Joint Statement on Researching, Exploring Deep Space

NANO TECH
Tungsten offers nano-interconnects a path of least resistance

Nanoscale islands dot light-driven catalyst

Nanoparticle supersoap creates 'bijel' with potential as sculptable fluid

Creative use of noise brings bio-inspired electronic improvement

NANO TECH
Global Airborne Mission to Make Ozone Hole Detour

New Radar Sensor Provides Clear Vision in Any Weather

Scientists monitor Silicon Valley's underground water reserves - from space

OSIRIS-REx views Pacifica on Earth Flyby

NANO TECH
Tungsten offers nano-interconnects a path of least resistance

Nanoscale islands dot light-driven catalyst

Nanoparticle supersoap creates 'bijel' with potential as sculptable fluid

Creative use of noise brings bio-inspired electronic improvement

NANO TECH
UBS could slash third of staff amid technology shift: CEO

Mattel scraps plan for digital assistant for kids

DeepMind forms ethics unit for AI; Google unveils $49 mini assistant

Robot Spelunkers Go for a Dip




Memory Foam Mattress Review
Newsletters :: SpaceDaily :: SpaceWar :: TerraDaily :: Energy Daily
XML Feeds :: Space News :: Earth News :: War News :: Solar Energy News






The content herein, unless otherwise known to be public domain, are Copyright 1995-2017 - Space Media Network. All websites are published in Australia and are solely subject to Australian law and governed by Fair Use principals for news reporting and research purposes. AFP, UPI and IANS news wire stories are copyright Agence France-Presse, United Press International and Indo-Asia News Service. ESA news reports are copyright European Space Agency. All NASA sourced material is public domain. Additional copyrights may apply in whole or part to other bona fide parties. All articles labeled "by Staff Writers" include reports supplied to Space Media Network by industry news wires, PR agencies, corporate press officers and the like. Such articles are individually curated and edited by Space Media Network staff on the basis of the report's information value to our industry and professional readership. Advertising does not imply endorsement, agreement or approval of any opinions, statements or information provided by Space Media Network on any Web page published or hosted by Space Media Network. Privacy Statement